Feder Observatory

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Archive for the ‘Observing Log’


Observing Log 11/22/2014 0

Posted on November 23, 2014 by Matt

Elias Holte, Erin Aadland, Brandon Crowe, Brian Ternes, and Lauren Ugelstad arrived at the observatory with intentions of getting data on M15 for a project of Brian’s. However, the telescope was not aligned correctly and thought that its zenith was somewhere at a 45 degree declination. By the time this problem was fixed M15 had passed through the low airmass window we were hoping to gather data from. After this the group scrambled to salvage the night (in terms of data) and tried to get some data on an exoplanet transit, but missed the start of the transit. Unfortunately, no usable data came out of the night.
Focus: 2809
Outside temperature: 32F

November 21, 2014 Observing Log 0

Posted on November 22, 2014 by Juan

Elias Holte, Erin Aadland, Brandon Crowe, Brian Ternes, and Lauren Ugelstad arrived at the observatory with intentions of getting data on M15 for a project of Brian’s. However, the telescope was not aligned correctly and thought that its zenith was somewhere at a 45 degree declination. By the time this problem was fixed M15 had passed through the low airmass window we were hoping to gather data from. After this the group scrambled to salvage the night (in terms of data) and tried to get some data on an exoplanet transit, but missed the start of the transit. Unfortunately, no usable data came out of the night.

Focus: 2809

Outside temperature: 0˚ C

Regards,
The Students of Observational Astronomy 366.

October 26, 2014 Observing Log 0

Posted on October 27, 2014 by Juan

Lauren U. and Erin A. went out to the telescope to observe the exoplanet transit of TrES-3b.  The evening started off well with Dr. Craig having the telescope already connected so we didn’t have to deal with any errors!  The transit started at 9:40 and ended at 10:56. The images look beautiful with a focus of 2853 and a temperature of 59 degrees.  However, when returning the telescope to home the computer froze once again and had to be restarted.

Observing Log 10/26/2014 0

Posted on October 26, 2014 by Matt

Lauren U. and Erin A. went out to the telescope to observe the exoplanet transit of TrES-3b.  The evening started off well with Dr. Craig having the telescope already connected so we didn’t have to deal with any errors!  The transit started at 9:40 and ended at 10:56. The images look beautiful with a focus of 2853 and a temperature of 59 degrees.  However, when returning the telescope to home the computer froze once again and had to be restarted.

Observing Log 10/23/2014 0

Posted on October 23, 2014 by Matt

Lauren U., Erin A., Brandon C., Brian T., and Eli H. went out to the telescope in hopes of observing an exo-planet transit, however, time ran short. So the M-29 cluster was observed instead. Skies were clear and the CCD camera actually worked. However, the computer froze when trying to get flats, darks, and biases, and had to be rebooted.

Observing Log 10/21/2014 0

Posted on October 22, 2014 by Juan

Elias Holte, Erin Aadland, Lauren Ugelstad, Brandon Crowe, Brian Ternes, and Dr Craig spent around four hours behind the controls tonight with a temperature of 59.7F, focus set at 2842, and with a FWHM of 5.27. Starting around 7:45 everyone but Dr Craig (who arrived around 8:30) worked on getting the observatory up and running. After nearly an hour of troubleshooting Dr Craig came to the rescue and flipped the driver toggle switch to the “on” position. This was much appreciated.

We were able to take data on two objects tonight:

  • M29
  • M15

NOTE: Always make sure anyone in the observatory knows when you’re moving the telescope. Or wear hard hats.

Observing Log 10/21/2014 0

Posted on October 21, 2014 by Matt

Elias Holte, Erin Aadland, Lauren Ugelstad, Brandon Crowe, Brian Ternes, and Dr Craig spent around four hours behind the controls tonight with a temperature of 59.7F, focus set at 2842, and with a FWHM of 5.27. Starting around 7:45 everyone but Dr Craig (who arrived around 8:30) worked on getting the observatory up and running. After nearly an hour of troubleshooting Dr Craig came to the rescue and flipped the driver toggle switch to the “on” position. This was much appreciated.
We were able to take data on two objects tonight:
M29
M15
NOTE: Always make sure anyone in the observatory knows when you’re moving the telescope. Or wear hard hats.

Non-observing Log, 10/20/2014 0

Posted on October 20, 2014 by Juan

[Posted by Juan on behalf of the Astro 366 Students]

Erin A., Brandon C., Brian T., Eli H., and Lauren U. had a very interesting night.  The night was clear and we were ready to observe the sky, but unfortunately we ran into a problem connecting to the camera.  When we tried to connect, we received a pop up window that said “error opening camera, could not initialize the ccd camera(5).”  We managed to get both Juan Cabanela and Matt Craig on the phone at the same time.  After putting all seven of our heads together, we tried a variety of things and after being unsuccessful we gave up for the night.

Observing Log 10/19/2014 0

Posted on October 19, 2014 by Matt

Erin A., Brandon C., Brian T., Eli H., and Lauren U. had a very interesting night.  The night was clear and we were ready to observe the sky, but unfortunately we ran into a problem connecting to the camera.  When we tried to connect, we received a pop up window that said “error opening camera, could not initialize the ccd camera(5).”  We managed to get both Juan Cabanela and Matt Craig on the phone at the same time.  After putting all seven of our heads together, we tried a variety of things and after being unsuccessful we gave up for the night.

Observing Log, 10/9/2014 0

Posted on October 09, 2014 by Matt

Matt Craig, Erin Aadland, Brian Ternes and Brandon Crowe went observing tonight. Very clear night, shot several calibration shots, then science images of:

  • BU Cam (R filter)
  • Kelt-1 b (R filter)
  • NGC 1039 (BVRI)

Air temperature was 36F, focus set to 2830 and FWM around 5. We ended up just taking one image of each science object because people needed to get back to homework.

We also took out one of the 6-inch celestrons and looked at the Moon, Mizar/Alcor, Albireo, the Ring Nebula and Uranus. Technically we probably also had some photons from Pluto hit our eyes too but we couldn’t actually see it.



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